Modeling Ebola Contagion Using Airline Networks in R

I first became interested in networks when reading Matthew O’Jackson’s 2010 paper describing their application to economics. During the 2014 ebola outbreak, there was a lot of concern over the disease spreading to the U.S.. I was caught up with work/classes at the time, but decided to use airline flight data to at least explore the question.

The source for the data can be found in a previous post on spatial data visualization.

I assumed that the disease had a single origin (Liberia) and wanted to explore the question of how the disease could travel to the U.S. through a network of airline flights.

A visualization of the network can be seen below. Each node is a country and each edge represents an existing airline route from one country to another. Flights that take off and land in the same country are omitted to avoid clutter.

Each vertex is a country and each edge represents and existing airline route between two countries. Flights beginning and ending in the same country are not represented for clarity.
Each node is a country and each edge represents an existing airline route between two countries. Flights beginning and ending in the same country are not represented for clarity.

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